This month we were really spoiled for choice when it came to fantastic writing from all corners of the internet. At this rate we’re going to need a ‘further reading’ tab to cover everything. That said, we’ve narrowed it down to these: some incredibly frank and brilliantly witty words on having an article commissioned, a look at a bunch of ways your brain is influenced – from perception to misconception, the fascinating story of Tumblr teens, and the role that music journalism plays in the modern music industry. Plus, a month off from the ever fascinating US election. Phew.

How People Learn To Become Resilient
The New Yorker, Maria Konnikova

Mostly focusing of the work of three different psychologists and their individual studies, Konnikova takes an in-depth look at how a person becomes resilient and how this trait can be enhanced, learnt or neglected. The role of perception is huge here, the way we view the events in our lives determines our reaction to them, in turn varying our resilience. There are positives to be found everwhere.

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Elle On Earth
Observer, by Jacques Hyzagi

With a pure wry wit, Hyzagi describes in minute detail, and with rage so real you can feel it, the process of getting an interview with the legendary designer Rei Kawakubo commissioned. The painful process of having your work torn to shreds, of the endless frustration of dealing with sub editors, it’s all laid bare here. Ever wanted to be a writer? Read this first.

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The Secret Lives of Tumblr Teens
New Republic, by Elspeth Reeve

Not only is this a brilliant look at the strange world of shareable content and tumblr’s place within that, but it’s an insanely beautiful article. As it flits from pizza to cats to strawberries and reposts, it tells a meticulously researched story of how a group of users made themselves a small fortune gaming the system and calculating what would make you click share. Unfortunately, these things can’t last forever. Their demise? Find out within.

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Women Do What They Need To Do To Survive
Hazlitt, by Jade Blair

We probably don’t realise how engrained it is, but everyone has predisposed notions of how we think you should react to certain situations, an idea of how certain things happening would make you feel. Blair looks at how harmful these ideas are, both during and after attack, we don’t all react in the way we expect to, not all dangers look like we taught they should and this is problematic from all sides of the equation.

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Formidable Joys: Critics, And Criticism
Clash, by Robin Murray

Music criticism is an odd thing, and as the internet swarms with opinions – well written ones, pieced together ones, and some merely intended to harm – it can be hard to work out their value on the whole. With music so readily accessible, what is the role of the music writer and the importance of the reactions to this. Murray looks at a recent example that inspired a difficult response to tackle the subject.

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The Benjamin Franklin Effect
You Are Not So Smart, by David McRaney

When I was first starting university, advice was placed upon advice until I basically had no idea how to interact with people I was meeting for the first time. However one thing stuck with me, one surprising, but perfectly reasonable piece of advice I read was along the lines of “in order to make friends don’t offer to do things for people, ask instead for them to help you”. Welcome to what I will now forever call, the Benjamin Franklin effect.

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