Welcome to the second edition of ‘In Other Words’, our new monthly article where we collate a selection of the best contributions from different corners of the internet. This month we’ve actually come back to music somewhat, with pieces looking at the way cities make certain genres more able to flourish than others, how grime is the new voice of protest and an in-depth look at the absurd situation Kesha is in. Whatever piques your interest, here’s our favourites from the last month.

How Politics Breaks Our Brains
The Atlantic, Brian Resnick

It’s possible the most important quote from this article is “Understanding the other side’s point of view, even if one disagrees with it, is central to compromise, policymaking, and any hope for civility in civic life.” This is a scientific look at partisanship, and the ways that we can create a less ‘us vs them’ electorate and introduce more understanding, how we can add a more human element to politics. Fascinating experiments, with intriguing outcomes, and a stark reminder of the importance of compromise.

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From Berlin’s Warehouses To London’s Estates: How Cities Shape Music Scenes
The Guardian, by Ian Wylie

It’s really difficult to imagine exactly how the buildings and structure of a city affects not only the places that music is popular, but which scenes flourish in different locations across the world. Of course a huge range of things influences this, but the buildings, and the history of them plays a huge part. From garage rock in rainy Seattle to the high-rises of London fostering Grime and the pirate radio stations it thrived on, it’s easy to forget the huge impact our surroundings have on what proliferates.

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Pop Needs Its Warrior Kesha
The Fader, by Aimee Cliff

There’s been a great deal written about the almost-unbelievable, completely hideous case between Kesha and the Sony subsidiary owned by Lukasz Gottwald. But this piece on the Fader stands out for having actually been written by a fan. Someone who understands the distinctive and important voice Kesha has held in popular music, refusing to be belittled or shy away from difficult subjects. For anyone wanting more details on the case beyond the basic ones reported most elsewhere, you’ll find a straight forward breakdown of the accusations and responses that haven’t been so easily decipherable elsewhere. Regardless of whether you’re a Kesha fan or not, this is an important case with huge implications.

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The White Knight Delusion
The Baffler, by Abi Wilkinson

The notion that restricting refugees will protect women from assault was a pretty prevalent one post the New Years Eve attacks in Cologne. Using a range of examples from the slave trade to more recent hate crimes, Wilkinson shines a light on the hypocrisy behind the idea that women are safer with refugees or foreign influence removed.

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Party Politics: Why Grime Defines The Sound Of Protest In 2016
The Guardian, by Dan Hancox

You know that really annoying question; why aren’t band’s political anymore? Well this takes a detailed look at the politics running through grime. Examining how things have changed since the days of Billy Bragg, Paul Weller and the Red Wedge tour, and more importantly why they’ve changed. Also delving into the relationship between artists, fans and the police, with events and careers having been impacted hugely by the authorities, it’s a brilliant look at an important movement.

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