Australian Invasion // Feature

Josh Pyke

This November, London seems to be packed full of brilliant Australian musicians. Why anyone would want to leave Australia right on the brink of that glorious summer and trudge around England at its dreariest is beyond me – but let’s not complain, as we’re about to be graced with some of the best talents the Antipodes has to offer. Here are our picks of the bunch – the Aussies who you’d best see before they take the whole world by storm.

JOSH PYKE

November 6 – Oslo, Hackney

Prefer your singer-songwriters? Give Josh Pyke a listen. His beautiful voice is the soundtrack to all my teenage summers, and four albums later he continues to impress. He’s wonderful live, fiddling with all sorts of loop pedals for an intricate, interesting sound – plus he’s a genuinely hilarious guy with top-notch stage banter.

THE KITE STRING TANGLE

November 11 – Shacklewell Arms

A relative newcomer on the Australian scene, The Kite String Tangle (aka Danny Harley) is a master of chilled-out electronica, fusing brilliant beats perfectly with his dreamy voice. Also; it’s a free show, what could possibly stop you?

BOY & BEAR

November 14 – O2 Shepherd’s Bush Empire

I may or may not have cried at multiple Boy & Bear gigs before. The Sydney folk-rock quintet has sincerity to their music that’s only augmented seeing them live. Another band with hilarious on-stage rapport, they’re known to really give you your money’s worth – often playing sets close to two hours long. Two brilliant albums under their belt ensure an impressive set list and a good time, and undoubtedly some tears from this writer.

REMI.

November 14 – Islington Metal Works

REMI is just the personification of everything that is cool. He has, excuse the expression, way too much #swag for his own good, and after winning national youth broadcaster Triple J’s Best Newcomer last year he’s one to keep your eyes on. Debut album RAW X INFINITY has been nominated for a J award for the best Aussie album of the year, and his live shows always promise a huge party.

DMA’S

November 14 – Club NME, KOKO

Pretty much Australia’s ‘hype band’ for the year, DMA’s are killing it at the moment. The Sydney three-piece is compellingly honest, with influences from Britpop and a softer, more acoustic sound. Also, they’re incredibly humble and sweet guys. Another act to watch!

BALL PARK MUSIC

November 18 & 19 – Underbelly Hoxton/Nambucca 

These guys are hands down one of Australia’s best live acts of the past decade; insanely talented, incredibly friendly and born performers. Recent Australian tours have seen an encore consisting of Bohemian Rhapsody in its entirety, a Shakespearean owl-like creature (a ‘puddinghead’), the Mexican Hat Dance and complimentary 3D glasses. The Brisbane band put on a proper show, and after their phenomenal third album Puddinghead you’re in for a real treat. If there’s an Australian gig not to be missed, it’s this one.

CHET FAKER

November 20 – Coronet Theatre (Sold Out)

Chet Faker (or Nick Murphy to his mum) is a legitimate dreamboat. His debut album Built On Glass is another one up for Triple J’s album of the year, and deservedly so. You might know him from his collaboration with EDM heavyweight Flume, but the Chet Faker project is much more than that. Through a mix of expertly crafted electronic sounds, a guitar and his impeccably soulful voice, he manages to mix the nostalgia of traditional music delivery and artful modern electronica – and his live show is magical, quite frankly.

STICKY FINGERS

November 22 – The Garage

Sticky Fingers’ own website bio sums up the Sydney band better than anything else – “Some bands meet from lame shit like Gumtree advertisements, while others are formed with a touch of the divine. Instead, Paddy and Dyz struck up a chat, bonding over mutual hobbies like music and weed (the basis of every substantial friendship).” Prime contenders for the title of biggest stoners in Australian music, they mix pop, psych, reggae and various substances to create a brilliant Australiana sound that you can’t help but boogie to.

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Want to know more about Australian music? Follow our expert in residence Matilda Edwards