Field Day is closing in and we are getting more excited by the day, we caught up with an act we are particularly looking forward to, Barely Legal.

Our recent excitement has been exemplified even more by the recent announcement of a new stage in association with Superdry. Superdry Sounds will feature the likes of Mahalia, Sassy 009, Conner Youngblood and Klose One across the two days. As we peruse the stage splits and start to fill out our Clashfinders, one of the young artists we are looking forward to catching is Barely Legal – Saturday on the EYOE stage.

Despite still only being in her mid-twenties, Chloe Robinson aka Barely Legal has been a solid presence across the U.K. club circuit for closing in on a decade now. MistaJam’s ears pricked when he heard her first mix, which she put out aged 19, and from there Robinson quickly went from strength to strength. Her recent FACT mix –below – showcases her love for bass music in all its forms, as well as her ability to kick-start a party anytime, anywhere.

Her sets have always had a nostalgic flavour to them, thanks largely to her UKG loving Mum, who inspired her taste from day one. Barely Legal’s reputation precedes her; she’s a hardworker, takes her craft seriously, reads a crowd astutely, and really, really loves bass. Having said before that she favours the element of surprise, a Barely Legal set is high octane, genre-bending and unpredictable. Inspired by all the finest, richest, and most bassy corners of the U.K’s rich musical heritage, Robinson may lure you in with a familiar riff or vocal, but you can bet she’ll surprise you somewhere sooner along the line than you might think.

A normal summer for Barely Legal sees her playing multiple festivals, regularly bringing the heat to warm up spots on the main stage. This summer will be no different, with shows at Field Day, Parklife and Outlook already in the calendar. Add a record label – her own Pretty Weird Records – and a slew of club shows across the U.K. and beyond to the mix, and it’s clear that Robinson has zero intention of slowing.

Barely Legal plays the Eat Your Own Ears stage on the Saturday of this year’s Field Day in its new home of Brockwell Park. Ahead of her set, she breaks down five of the records that made her fall in love with London’s music scene.

JAMES FOX – PUT IT BACK (RAMADANMAN REFIX)


For me, Ramadanman really represents the FWD>> Plastic People days, so it was essential that I included a track of his. I went to Plastic People every week, it played a huge part in opening my eyes to new sounds as a young raver. Little did I know it would be so crucial in moulding me into who I am today!

AIR & LACK THEREOF – JAMES BLAKE

I had to include James in this. To this day, he’s still up there as one of my top 10 favourite producers. I was so fortunate to be in London as Boiler Room was starting out, and I remember seeing James Blake at one of their original shows. It was in a room of about 25 people in a space in Hackney, I remember it was snowing really heavily outside.

MARTYN – VANCOUVER

Timeless. This track will forever be a part of my sets.

COKI – TREE TRUNK

There was something truly magical about club culture during the dubstep era. Just a room full of people, all so passionate about the music, I miss those days a lot. Recently I went to XOYO when Artwork did his Big Apple Records party with Magnetic Man, Chef, Coki, Loefah etc. It was so nostalgic for me, it took me right back to my first experiences of raving in London. Dubstep definitely defines a large part of who I am musically.

ADDISON GROOVE – WORK IT

For me, Addison was part of the post-dubstep era, when Swamp81 were really making their mark. It was another really exciting time for U.K. music, and all of Addison Groove’s tracks from back then still make regular appearances in my sets.

Barely Legal plays Field Day, Saturday 2nd June.